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Hydrothermal carbonization and pellet production from Egeria densa and Lemna minor

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Hydrothermal carbonization and pellet production from Egeria densa and Lemna minor

Álvarez Bermúdez, Xana; Cancela Carral, Maria De Los Angeles; Freitas, Vanesa; Valero Gutiérrez del Olmo, Enrique Maria; Sánchez Bermúdez, Ángel Manuel; Acuña Alonso, Carolina
 
DATE : 2020-03-31
UNIVERSAL IDENTIFIER : http://hdl.handle.net/11093/1839
UNESCO SUBJECT : 2207.09 Conversión de Energía ; 2417.07 Algología (Ficología) ; 2508 Hidrología
DOCUMENT TYPE : article

ABSTRACT :

Biofuels are seen as a potential option for mitigating the effects of fossil fuel use. On the other hand, nutrient pollution is accelerating eutrophication rates in rivers, lakes, and coastal waters. Harvesting aquatic plants to produce biofuels could mitigate this problem, though it is important to attack the problem at source, mainly as regards the contribution of nutrients. For the first time, solid biofuels were obtained in the forms of carbon and pellets from the aquatic plants Egeria densa, which is classed as an invasive plant under the Spanish Catalogue of Exotic Invasive Species, and Lemna minor, both of which can be found in the Umia River in north-west Spain. The essential oils and macro- and microelements present in both these plants were also extracted and analyzed. The higher heating values (HHVs) of the carbon products obtained ranged from 14.28 to 17.25 MJ/kg. The ash content ranged from 22.69% to 49.57%. The maximum yield obtained for biochar for Egeria densa at 200 °C was 66.89%. Temperature significantly affects solid hydrochar yield. The HHVs of the pellets ... [+]
Biofuels are seen as a potential option for mitigating the effects of fossil fuel use. On the other hand, nutrient pollution is accelerating eutrophication rates in rivers, lakes, and coastal waters. Harvesting aquatic plants to produce biofuels could mitigate this problem, though it is important to attack the problem at source, mainly as regards the contribution of nutrients. For the first time, solid biofuels were obtained in the forms of carbon and pellets from the aquatic plants Egeria densa, which is classed as an invasive plant under the Spanish Catalogue of Exotic Invasive Species, and Lemna minor, both of which can be found in the Umia River in north-west Spain. The essential oils and macro- and microelements present in both these plants were also extracted and analyzed. The higher heating values (HHVs) of the carbon products obtained ranged from 14.28 to 17.25 MJ/kg. The ash content ranged from 22.69% to 49.57%. The maximum yield obtained for biochar for Egeria densa at 200 °C was 66.89%. Temperature significantly affects solid hydrochar yield. The HHVs of the pellets obtained ranged from 11.38 to 13.49 MJ/kg. The use of these species to obtain biofuels through hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) and pellets is a novel and effective approach that will facilitate the removal of nutrients that cause eutrophication in the Umia River. The elements extracted show that harvesting these plants will help to remove excessive nutrients from the ecosystem. [-]

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