Repositorio UVigo

Harnessing the potential of native microbial communities for bioremediation of oil spills in the Iberian Peninsula NW coast

Investigo Repository

Harnessing the potential of native microbial communities for bioremediation of oil spills in the Iberian Peninsula NW coast

Bôto, Maria L.; Magalhães, Catarina; Perdigão, Rafaela; Alexandrino, Diogo A. M.; Fernandes, Joana P.; Bernabeu Tello, Ana Maria; Ramos, Sandra; Carvalho, Maria F.; Semedo, Miguel; LaRoche, Julie; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Mucha, Ana Paula
 
DATE : 2021-04-23
UNIVERSAL IDENTIFIER : http://hdl.handle.net/11093/2543
UNESCO SUBJECT : 2510 Oceanografía ; 2510.90 Geología Marina
DOCUMENT TYPE : article

ABSTRACT :

Oil spills are among the most catastrophic events to marine ecosystems and current remediation techniques are not suitable for ecological restoration. Bioremediation approaches can take advantage of the activity of microorganisms with biodegradation capacity thus helping to accelerate the recovery of contaminated environments. The use of native microorganisms can increase the bioremediation efficiency since they have higher potential to survive in the natural environment while preventing unpredictable ecological impacts associated with the introduction of non-native organisms. In order to know the geographical scale to which a native bioremediation consortium can be applied, we need to understand the spatial heterogeneity of the natural microbial communities with potential for hydrocarbon degradation. In the present study, we aim to describe the genetic diversity and the potential of native microbial communities to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, at an early stage of bioremediation, along the NW Iberian Peninsula coast, an area particularly susceptible to oil spills. Seawater ... [+]
Oil spills are among the most catastrophic events to marine ecosystems and current remediation techniques are not suitable for ecological restoration. Bioremediation approaches can take advantage of the activity of microorganisms with biodegradation capacity thus helping to accelerate the recovery of contaminated environments. The use of native microorganisms can increase the bioremediation efficiency since they have higher potential to survive in the natural environment while preventing unpredictable ecological impacts associated with the introduction of non-native organisms. In order to know the geographical scale to which a native bioremediation consortium can be applied, we need to understand the spatial heterogeneity of the natural microbial communities with potential for hydrocarbon degradation. In the present study, we aim to describe the genetic diversity and the potential of native microbial communities to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, at an early stage of bioremediation, along the NW Iberian Peninsula coast, an area particularly susceptible to oil spills. Seawater samples collected in 47 sites were exposed to crude oil for 2 weeks, in enrichment experiments. Seawater samples collected in situ, and samples collected after the enrichment with crude oil, were characterized for prokaryotic communities by using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and predictive functional profiling. Results showed a drastic decrease in richness and diversity of microbial communities after the enrichment with crude oil. Enriched microbial communities were mainly dominated by genera known to degrade hydrocarbons, namely Alcanivorax, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Rhodococcus, Flavobacterium, Oleibacter, Marinobacter, and Thalassospira, without significant differences between geographic areas and locations. Predictive functional profiling of the enriched microbial consortia showed a high potential to degrade the aromatic compounds aminobenzoate, benzoate, chlorocyclohexane, chlorobenzene, ethylbenzene, naphthalene, polycyclic aromatic compounds, styrene, toluene, and xylene. Only a few genera contributed for more than 50% of this genetic potential for aromatic compounds degradation in the enriched communities, namely Alcanivorax, Thalassospira, and Pseudomonas spp. This work is a starting point for the future development of prototype consortia of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria to mitigate oil spills in the Iberian NW coast. [-]

Show full item record



Files in this item

Attribution 4.0 International Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International
2013 Universidade de Vigo, Todos los derechos reservados
Calidad So9001