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dc.contributor.authorPérez Curiel, Concha
dc.contributor.authorRúas Araújo, José 
dc.contributor.authorRivas de Roca, Rubén
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-27T07:22:05Z
dc.date.available2022-05-27T07:22:05Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-26
dc.identifier.citationMedia and Communication, 10(2): 157-168 (2022)eng
dc.identifier.issn21832439
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11093/3484
dc.description.abstractThe Covid-19 vaccination has meant a huge challenge for crisis communication. After months of lockdowns, mass vaccination was a silver lining moment, but it was under threat from disinformation boosted by misinformation on social media. This research explores how opinion leaders among political leaders and health experts used Twitter to create and manage messages about the vaccination process. Specifically, we show the issues (issue frame) and strategies (game frame) applied by these actors. This study employs a corpus on the words “Covid-19” and “vaccines” used on Twitter by the heads of government and 10 recognized health experts (two for each country) in the US, the UK, France, Portugal, and Spain. We also analyze the accounts of fact-checking projects on those countries (@PolitiFact, @FullFact, @decodeurs, @JornalPoligrafo, and @maldita). The sample allows the comparison of countries with different political cultures that participated differently in the production of vaccines. The data were captured from the beginning of the vaccination drive (December 14th, 2020) until most of the population above 60 were vaccinated (May 14th, 2021). A manual content analysis was performed on the tweets (n = 2,607). The results illustrate that the politicians mostly disagreed with experts regarding issues and strategies. This finding can foster distrust in the elites and, therefore, threatens the long-term success of a public health campaign. Our study contributes to discussions on the role of networks for social cohesion, arguing that the public conversation on Twitter about the vaccination has revealed high levels of controversy.eng
dc.description.sponsorshipMinisterio de Ciencia e Innovación | Ref. PDC2021–121720‐I00spa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherMedia and Communicationspa
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/AEI/Plan Estatal de Investigación Científica y Técnica y de Innovación 2017-2020/PDC2021-121720-I00/ES
dc.rightsAtribución 4.0 Internacional
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/deed.es
dc.titleWhen politicians meet experts: disinformation on Twitter about Covid-19 vaccinationeng
dc.typearticlespa
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccessspa
dc.identifier.doi10.17645/mac.v10i2.4955
dc.identifier.editorhttps://www.cogitatiopress.com/mediaandcommunication/article/view/4955spa
dc.publisher.departamentoComunicación audiovisual e publicidadespa
dc.subject.unesco5910.01 Informaciónspa
dc.subject.unesco5910.02 Medios de Comunicación de Masasspa
dc.subject.unesco3212 Salud Publicaspa
dc.date.updated2022-05-27T07:18:17Z
dc.computerCitationpub_title=Media and Communication|volume=10|journal_number=2|start_pag=157|end_pag=168spa


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    Atribución 4.0 Internacional
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